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Elizabeth Themeli

Special Correspondent

 

Raw air that freezes to the bones. Lights bright enough to blind, pierce through the dark and illuminate the night. People crowd and scream to the point where one’s own thoughts cannot be heard. Why would anyone want to be here? Because the Red Sea will do anything to show support for the Holliston High School football team.

Almost every Friday night, the Red Sea brings every ounce of spirit to the bleachers so they can cheer on their favorite team. The Red Sea consists of high schoolers that dress up in red and go the extra mile to express love for the players.

The question is, are they going too far with their traditions? The use of horns and baby powder have caused administration to step in. Recent controversy over underclassmen being allowed in the bleachers have stirred up trouble. And of course, the crazy outfits are always raising eyebrows.

Though the fanbase is a source of positivity, people have drawn the line on certain rituals. Horns became a popular tool used to crank up the excitement and rile up the players. They were so loud they were distracting players and disturbing fans outside of The Sea. The administration decided it was best to ban the hooters to avoid further conflict.

Then came the infamous baby powder during the team’s “blackout” events. In these events, all of the team wear their black jerseys for big games against rival towns. It has been a tradition for the Red Sea to throw baby powder in the crowd, forming a smokey and unique haze over the bleachers, and if lucky, the field.

Similar to the use of horns, the powder became a distraction. When the powder hit the field the player’s attention would be drawn to it. Along with distraction, it also left a mess. Empty bottles and the left over substance littered the stands to the point where the school made a rule against fans throwing baby powder during games.

These are not the only issues to have surfaced in the Red Sea. The presence of underclassmen in the bleachers has also created problems.

Many people believe that only upperclassman should be allowed in the bleachers. According to them, the underclassmen should wait their turn just as the upperclassmen have waited for theirs. Others agree that the bleachers are for upperclassman, but if there is room and an underclassman is full of spirit, the spot is theirs.

“I dont have a problem with underclassmen in the Red Sea, as long as they kindly make room for upperclassmen,” said junior Kristina Silvestro.

Then there are the people who just don’t care. If someone is decked out all in red and knows how to show love for their town, they are welcome. A loud voice is loud voice, regardless of grade.

This issue has been resolved for the most part, and both underclassmen and upperclassman have more respect for one another. After all, everyone is rooting for the same team.

Freshman or Senior, a patriotic outfit is a must. Facepaint and sparkles are common for girls, and for the boys- body paint. From head to toe, boys have painted themselves red, sometimes adding on certain numbers and words just to show the love. Rarely, fans sport the red body suit. Now that’s spirit.

The football team has just won the TVL’S and are heading into their post game season. The Red Sea is expected to be better then ever. Loud cheers and decked out fans will always be a part of the experience, but to truly support their team, the Red Sea needs to also let the Panthers play undistracted.

With the absence of horns of baby powder, players will be more focused and prepared to crush the opposing team. And regardless of administration’s new rules, the Red Sea will be there for their football team every step of the way.

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